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HEAVY HAUL AVG. PAY PER MILE VS OVERDIMENSIONAL PAY PER MILE!!

Question:

Can anyone tell me what the avg. rates per mile are for the following:
Heavy Haul avg rate per mile:
Overdimension avg rate per mile:
Also, do you have to go through special training for either of these driving jobs?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
KNOTHEAD45

Answer:


Well, I'll speak from the prespective that I see here at Landstar. The rates mostly are determined, in my words, the hassle factor. If the load is only a little wide (i.e 8.7 to say 9 foot wide) it really doesn't pay much more. I see that 10 wide and up to say 12 foot pays differently. Over 12 wide requires and escort(s) so it really has a hassle factor. I just got back off of this run:
A Telecommunications building from Bossier City Louisiana to Bloomington, Ca.
1500 miles. My linehaul was $4400.00, I got $1081.64 fuel surcharge and they alloted $600.00 for permits which I didn't need all of so I got the difference. My take home was $4624.00 on this load which came out to around a little better then $3.00 a mile. It was 11.11 foot wide and weighed 46,000 Lbs.
It all depends on a few factors:
1. Where's it going
2. Is it overweight and Overdimensional
3. Does it need tarping
4. Will the move fall on a weekend which will cause a layover
and also who the customer is. Some pay dearly for oversize and some think an oversize load is just a regular load with stipulations.
My rule of thumb is I should be getting at least $2.00 a mile to the car and that is just rock bottom. I can tell you this though. Man we have got some freight for Stepdeck/Flatbed stretch (extendable) trailers and the rates are through the roof.
Yes, you do need training, but more so common sense or should I say quite a bit of experience. You have got to be very alert. You see how some guys don't change lanes when there's a vehicle on the shoulder? Well, If I wouldn't have moved over I would have scar about 10 cars and a big car. So you've got to be alert and everybody didn't respect that I had a wide load on. Some 4 wheelers hung out right on the side of the load and the damn thing was sticking in their lanes at times. So I had to make adjustments. The wider the load the more you have to be alert.
Heavy Haul generally pays alot due to the weights.
For example:
I loaded back out of Cali. and I deliver in Slidell, Louisiana tommorrow.
6 cars, including me are bringing a disassembled crane back.
TRK 1. I got the track and some misc. parts and my pay is $3800.00
TRK 2. got the same as me and the same pay
TRK 3. got another legal part for same pay
TRK 4. got another legal part for same pay
TRK 5. got the 60,000 Lb. counterweight and got $5000.00 (permits included)
TRK 6. got the body of the crane, which is 90,000 Lbs. and required a 7 axle lowboy setup and he got $17,000 (seventeen thousand). His load is wide and heavy. He's been at Landstar for 13 years and owns a 4 axle tractor and the trailer, which probally cost him in the neighborhood of a couple hundred thousand dollars.

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Thanks for the reply. I sent you a PM and was surely hoping you would respond. Please read PM and contact as soon as possible.

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That looks more like to the car than take home. What was your actual take home after expenses? The money you put in your pocket makes all the difference in deciding worth.

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There are so many varibles in Over Dimentional (O/D) to put a price on a load is about impossible.. Every load is a "load in itself" and has to be judged on it's requirements..
Like what was said before.. the bigger, and heavier it is the more specialized equip. it will take. The more "hastle" the whole thing will be..
When you get overheight in some areas you need to have a route survey done. This is where someone goes over the route you are going to take and looks for low bridges and related stuff that'll prevent you from taking that route.. Philly, and NYC are famous for this, (I think if you are over 14' a route survey is required??) This could be hundreds of dollars and a couple of days to get it done) so to take a O/D load to them will be way more $$.. Police escorts are also sometimes required for BIG O/D stuff.. (They get paid by the hour...) another BIG $$ so .... that's why it'll cost like $3, $4, $8, $10 a mile???? It depends on the requirements.. Escorts can run $1 a mi easily. on up..
You have curfews... Can't run on weekends, hollidays, and rush hours.. You'll need Beacons, Strobes, flags, signs, and sometimes special chains.. (1/2" chains.. 35' straps.. outriggers, big tarps?? to mention some things)!
It takes a LOT more insurance to haul O/D... Both liability and Cargo (As a rule.. as most big stuff is expensive). This all plays into bidding a load.. what does $1 Million dollar cargo insurance cost?? I've never had a million dollar load but I know some who have..
Out of route miles... I have NEVER had a O/D load where I took the "shortest" route.. The permits ALWAYS ADDED at LEAST 10% more miles The "worst" I had to go a "extra" 100 miles on a 500 mi load.. So to give you a cut and dry dollar amount is not going to be possible... Every load has to be bid on it's own merrits and special circumstances...

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Escorts cost $1.35 to $1.45 per mile + $60.00 a night.

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All the previous replies are good ones. No two loads are the same. If you are wanting to get into this end of the industry, you're starting out right. Ask questions. Get used to asking them too. Are the dims(measurements) correct? Is the weight correct? That list goes on and on. It's a niche that requires patience. The payoff can be rewarding if ya learn well. One of the most common practices is for the broker/shipper/agent to minimize the importance of the size of the piece you may be looking at hauling. This allows them to prey on "your" inexperience and get you to commit to move a piece. After you have loaded it and started your trip, you find that there's not enough money in the load to pay for permits and or escorts and leave you any profit. They don't care, they made their money and you're left holding the bag.
As for your question about rates. I quote about a dozen loads a day when I have time. If someone asks me for a "quick" quote I tell them a dollar per mile per axle plus permits/escorts/route survey/ etc. with a 500 mile minimum. Then if they want a real quote, it takes a little longer but I put one together for them. Presently, I'm waiting for permit approval on a load that I started working on 2 months ago. Tn has been the stickler on this one so far. Ky(where the load originates)took 2 weeks, and Tn has denied the routes submitted 5 times so far. After or when they finally approve the route , we'll submit for Ms and once that's done, I'll setup the appropiate support people and go move the load. The customer keeps asking how long will it take to move the load. I figure about 4 to 5 days. Like I said before, it takes a lot of patience.
You're on the right track though. Keep asking questions. Good luck
Rigandig

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