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What do car haulers generally make and other ?'s about car h

Question:
Do car hauling jobs pay as high as 1.06 a mile like I've been told .
An acquaintence told me he drives up to 600 miles a day at this rate.
Is he stretching it ?
How many hours would it take to drive that far and load or unload cars also?
600 miles a day and 3000 mile a week doesn't sound typical from what I've read.
Is 2000 to 2500 mile a week normal?

Answer:

I dunno about the pay but a few years ago I was considering this. I asked a few guys that haul cars and they all said that there was too much competition now.
Makes sense. Every carstop has empty haulers in the lot.

Answer:

Just like every thing else, its pretty good for awhile then the word gets around and everybody and their brother is hauling cars. You see alot of them for sale. Waggoners caring does alot of car hauling and their terminal in Oklahoma City has them parked from one in to another. I think SWIFT got out of the buisness too, but I could be wrong. And you know SWIFTY does things cheap.
We used to have pretty good deal around home running local and for some good rates. Then every Farmer had to get into the caring buisness.
just my two cents!

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An old co-worker friend of mine used to haul cars for Ryder back when they had the contract for the GM plant in Wentzville. The money was great, the runs were good, and the benefits were excellent. They wore special coveralls that had Velcro closures instead of zippers and buttons so they wouldn't scratch the finish on the automobile, and these were provided by Ryder.
The downside is that the work wasn't consistent. They'd run their azzes off from early August until about the first of October, delivering the new models to the dealers. Then, it would taper off until about the end of February, and then they'd be running hard again, delivering cars for the summer season. When the assembly line shut down for re-tooling in the summer, they'd be off 3-4 weeks until the plant began producing cars again.
His wife had cancer of some sort, and he needed the steady benefits more than he needed the payroll, so he came over and ran appliances for us.


Answer:

Thank you SpotsCat.

Answer:

I have been a union carhauler for many years and will attempt to answer your questions in a proffessional manner, so bear with me.
dragracert99:
Yes, we make 1.065 per mile on the outbound leg and up to .875 on the return. We also get loading and per stop pay that equals out to about 1.35 and 1.00 repspectively. Any specifics are public knowledge and can be found online through the Teamster's website. You can read the entire contract there.
600 miles a day,? Yes he is stretching it a bit. I personally drive between 300 and 450 miles per day. 3000 miles per week is for freightbox drivers.
As for how many hours does it take, you have to realize that driving the car is not all we do. Our days are very different than what you may be used to.
My day tipically starts when I arrive at the terminal about 6:30 am to prepare for 7 am dispatch (yes, we get to pick our loads based on seniority). After receiving all paperwork, I go to the loading yards to load. Loading may involve up to 3 different yards. The cars have to be located in the yard, inspected for any damages and then driven on the car, correctly spotted and then chained down. Depending on the number of stops on the trip, the cars have to be loaded in the correct order for unloading at the dealer.
At my terminal, we deal with mixed loads, meaning not all the same type of cars. I may have cars, SUV's, minivans, cars or a combination of all of these. Once the load is on the car, it has to be brought down to height before leaving.
(If you look at a typical carhaul trailer, you'll notice we can't move our tandems to shift weight, so be careful where you put that diesel pickup!)
After all of this, it is usually 10 am or so. With 3 1/2 hours out of my day gone, it is finally time to drive. With an average trip length of 300 - 500 mile and 2 or 3 stops, I can usually get 1 or 2 stops off before the end of the day. The day usually ends around 5 pm. Total logged hours - 9 or 10. Most of us work 6 days a week and do not falsify our logs.
chris142 and pete359:
The only competition you would have to worry about is if you went to work for a non-union company, as these are very loosely run outfits, that tend to come and go quite regularlly, many using the resources of owner-operators.
If you're going to haul cars for a living in Detroit, check out the union companies like Cassen's, Allied, Jack Cooper or PTS (E&L and Leaseway). The pay, benefits and security are far superior to any other company around.
I assume the empty carhaulers you see in the carstops are non-union. We tend to stay away from carstops for many reasons. Two of which are:
1. We are to busy to be hanging around carstops.
2. When we are loaded, you'll notice our cargo hangs past both the front and rear of our cars. We are a little leery about parking next to some freight-box whose driver's license ink is still wet.
Aslo,I'll bet alot of the freight-boxes are empty too.
SpotsCat:
You mention Ryder. I used to work for Ryder before the Allied buyout. (Ahh, the memories...I'll save that for another thread.)
The schedule you mention is not too familliar to me. I work out of Detroit where we have multiple factories feeding us. Some terminals have only one factory, and when it goes down, so do you. In Detroit and at inbound rail heads the work is pretty steady. A week in August or January is all you can hope for being laid-off. (Yes, hope for... you always come back from lay-off)
Carhauling is not for everyone. Sixty percent of applicants do not make it through the initial traning. Maybe half of the remaining drivers are still at it six months later. People sometimes wonder why we get paid what we do. It certainly isn't for holding on to a steering wheel all day. The job consists aof many more responsibilities, all of which must be performed rain or shine.
I hope I have answered your questions from the point of view of someone who is active in the field with experience. If you want to keep this thread active with some more questions, i would be happy to answer them.

Answer:

Good post Polarbear1234. I used to haul cars under my own authority. I have also worked for another car hauler company, Fleetcar. There are two different parts of the carhauling business. One is primarily the union buys who mostly drive day cabs and stay in motels at night. These guys make very good money and have excellent benefits. I would say the majority of car haulers work for non-union companies. There is a lot of pressure on the union companies to lower rates by manufacturers. I would say that the majority of the union car haulers is direct from the manufacturers. In recent years they have seen a steady decline in market share by carriers like Fleetcar. Most non-union car haulers work on percentage. This means that they make a percentage of what the car makes. Most are owner operators. For instance, Fleetcar only has owner operators running and some of these people hire drivers to work for them. Companies such as Swift have drastically driven down rates. Like the above poster states, I also heard that Swift has gotten out of the car hauling business, but I still see some of their cars on the road.
There are three types of car hauling. Manufacturer's where the car haulers take the cars from the factory or distribution center to the dealer. Second are the ones who do the auctions. They may haul to and from these facilities to the car dealers. Third is the POV market. These are personal vehicles of those moving or transferring such as business executives and military personnel. These are very time intensive, but the pay is good. Even working for some of the lower rate carriers you should make at least $75M/year.
Hauling cars is very physically demanding work. Most will haul up to 10 cars, although there are some that can haul 14. It takes time to pull your cars, stage them, drive them on the car and chain them down. You are supposed to have one chain on each corner of every vehicle on your car.
I really enjoyed hauling cars. I would probably still be doing it, but fell off the top of my trailer an broke my back and both wrists several years ago. Rather than fight with the entire family, I gave it up for flats and step decks. The money is decent, but not as good as cars. It can take several hours to load your car. Yes, drivers load and secure their own cars. I have hauled new cars, but have also hauled a lot of used ones. The biggest challenge is not having any damage. That is what has hurt Swift, from what I have heard. Damage can break you in that business. Carriers usually don't hire inexperienced drivers for this type of work. I am not sure what current requirements are, but most want current car hauling experience along with a couple of years or more driving. Most car haulers do more deadheading than vans or other types of freight. After all, there is only one type of cargo you can haul with these cars. Good luck.

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I've been hauling cars for just 2 1/2 years. I don't work for a union, and average 170,000 miles a year. Through October 16'th this year I made $75,000. The company bought me a brand new car on the 16'th, and I've been in the shop trying to iron out the kinks of a new car for a good portion of the rest of the year. I'll make about b$85,000, but I was shooting for $90,000. I usually haul from auctions, which means hunting down your cars, and driving them to the car before you start loading. Some of the auctions are close to a square mile in size, so sometimes it takes a while to find your cars and get them to the car. There are people you can pay to do this, but I like to keep in shape, so I do it myself. We haul 48 states, which I really enjoy. The only problem is I don't get home very often.
It's not for everyone. It's a lot of work, but that's part of the allure for me. For the time I'm gone, and the miles I put in, I could probably make a comparable salary doing something else. There are a lot of good paying driving jobs out there these days. But I see myself doing this forever, or until my wife makes me get a local job, whichever comes first.
Oh yeah. In the time I've been hauling cars, I've had to sit and wait for a load twice. We have more to do than we can haul. We have a little over 70 cars, but the company has bought 10 more lately, and has more ordered. We harldy ever set emply, unless we want to.

Answer:

170,000 miles a year. That's running some distance. How do you find time to load, unload, and chain down the cars, running that kind of mileage.?

Answer:

Some people can load in less than an hour. I'm too afraid of denting a car to be that fast, but it is possible. Unloading can be done in half an hour. It's kind of like logging 15 minutes to unload at a dock.
Plus my car runs pretty good, and we run a lot of 75mph states.

Answer:

Okay, I wasn't criticizing, just matching those numbers with the times quoted above for finding, loading and securing the cars..

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Also, in years past, I could stop when I got tired, take a 4 or 5 hour nap and be good to go until my 10 or 11 hours driving time was up. I've been splitting my time for a long time. I don't like sitting around the carstop, so I generally only work or sleep. We'll have to see what the new year brings, now that I don't have the flexibility to stop when I'm tired, and take off again when I wake up. I've been driving cars in one form or another since I was 15, and I'm now 47. When I was young, I worked for my dad and didn't have to worry about logs too much. Looking back, I drove way too many hours. For quite some time now, I've been stopping when my attention span began to drift, and taking a break. Now that this option has been taken away from us, I have to drive straight through without a break to make the miles legally. So I've been adjusting my driving habits the best I can. Sometimes I get so tired I have to take a break, but I'm working on re-training myself to the new rules. For a long time now I've believed in safety first, and haven't had even a minor accident since I was 20. The government, in their zeal to squash our driving time, has thrown the safety option out the window. My mileage for 2006 will depend on how I'm able to adapt to running 11 hours without a break. It's pretty tough after loading to do this, but I'm committed to making it work.
I won't say I never fudge my time, but I'm pretty close. Plus all my reeceipts have to match up, and do. This keeps me fairly honest.

Answer:

I will comment further later but before that i will concur with prickly that an 8-car-carrier can be loaded/unloaded in about 1/2. I have seen people do it. I think i did it once but it was to risky.
In fact, another driver unloaded his AND MINE once at an auction because i was too tired that night. This guy was/is hyper.
Much, much more later.

Answer:

I have seen some drivers load in record time. I have always been a little slower, but I also had very little damage. If you get in a hurry loading or unloading cars, you are likely to damage something.
Running cars down at some of these auctions can really keep you in shape. I remember being in Minnesota several years ago with quite a bit of snow on the ground. There is a auction south of Minneapolis where I needed to pick up my load. It was a realy challenge trying to find my cars with so much snow on the ground. You see, they are put in slots or parking spaces which are numbered. Unfortunately, the numbers were on the ground which was mostly still covered with snow. It was rather interesting trying to load at -40 F. BBBRRRR!!!!! The wind was really whipping around that night. I have also loaded at 105+F in Houston. If you like being outside in the elements it can be a great job. If making a lot of money is your only motivation, I would suggest doing something else. I firmly believe that we should all have jobs which we enjoy. Money should not be the priM factor it often becomes. Life is too short to work at a job which you detest.

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PS
The cool thing about auctions are the cars are used and thus already have scratches and scuffs on them so you can sort of load them fast anyways.
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